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^: *http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1445-6664 /issues (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1445-6664/ issues)
^: Leskovsek R.; Datta A.; Knezevic S.Z.; Simoncic A.
^: Common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) dry matter allocation and partitioning under different nitrogen and density levels [ (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). . ]
^: Weed Biology & Management, 2012; Vol.12,N 2. - P. 98-108
^: 2012
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^: Dry matter partitioning and allocation is a major determinant of plant growth and its competitiveness. Common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is a troublesome agronomic weed species and it is also a major health concern in Europe and many other countries because of its rapid spreading and production of allergenic pollen. A field experiment was conducted in 2009 to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilizer levels (0, 100, and 200 kg ha−1) and plant density levels (1.3, 6.6, and 13.2 plants per m2) on the leaf, stem dry matter partitioning, and dry matter allocation of ragweed. With an increasing density, the stem partitioning coefficient increased, whereas the leaf partitioning coefficient decreased. The addition of nitrogen had a limited effect on the leaf and stem dry matter partitioning. The root dry matter production decreased with an increasing density and was not influenced by the addition of nitrogen. Under intraspecific competition, ragweed exhibited a stronger above-ground competition intensity than below the ground, which resulted in a greater root : shoot ratio, compared to the low-density stands. The level of nitrogen influenced the vertical leaf, stem, and total dry matter distribution, with a greater allocation to the top stratum of the plants, thus increasing their competition for light. The biomass allocation of ragweed to the roots in response to the nitrogen supply exhibited a low plasticity, compared to the shoots, which displayed a high plasticity. The results of this study suggested that, under intraspecific conditions and with an increasing nitrogen supply, ragweed would be more competitive in above-ground resource acquisition. aref1

^TRN: 1440318
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