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^: *http://esa.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/esa
^: Walse S.S.; Myers S.W.; Liu Yong-Biao; Bellamy D.E.; Obenland D.; Simmons G.S.; Tebbets S.
^: Postharvest Treatment of Fresh Fruit From California With Methyl Bromide for Control of Light Brown Apple Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) [ (, , , , , , ), , , Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)]
^: Journal of Economic Entomology, 2013; Vol.106,N 3. - P. 1155-1163
^: 2013
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^: Methyl bromide (MB) chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in fresh fruit destined for export from California. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines (all Prunus spp.), apples (Malus spp.), raspberries (Rubus spp.), or grapes (Vitis spp.). Varying the applied MB dose and the differential sorption of MB by the loads resulted in a range of exposures, expressed as concentration x time cross products (CTs) that were verified by gas-chromatographic quantification of MB in chamber headspace over the course of each fumigation. CTs ≥60 and ≥72 mg liter−1 h at 10.0 0.5 and 15.6 0.5C (x s, average SD), respectively, yielded complete mortality of ≈ 6,200 larvae at each temperature. These confirmatory fumigations corroborate E. postvittana mortality data for the first time in relation to measured MB exposures and collectively comprise the largest number of larval specimens tested to date. In addition, a kinetic model of MB sorption was developed for the quarantine fumigation of fresh fruit based on the measurement of exposures and how they varied across the fumigation trials. The model describes how to manipulate the applied MB dose, the load factor, and the load geometry for different types of packaged fresh fruit so that the resultant exposure is adequate for insect control. aref1

^TRN: 1463205
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