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^: *http://jee.oxfordjournals.org/content/by/year
^: Michaud J.P.; Abdelwahab A.H.; Bayoumy M.H.; Awadalla S.S.; El-Gendy M.
^: Measuring the Costs of Limb Regeneration and Their Transgenerational Consequences in Two Nearctic Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) [ Coleomegilla maculata Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). . ]
^: Journal of Economic Entomology, 2020; Vol.113,N 4. - P. 1780-1785
^: 2020
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^: We examined the ability of Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer and Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville to regenerate, during pupation, a foreleg amputated in the fourth instar. Leg regeneration was complete for 80.7% of amputated H. convergens larvae, with 12.5% regenerating partially, and 6.8% showing no regeneration. Regeneration in C. maculata was 72.2% complete, 20.5% partial, and 7.2% none, but mortality following ablation was slightly higher than for H. convergens (7.4 vs. 0.6%). Ablation/regeneration caused a slight delay in pupation, but pupation time, fresh mass at emergence, and reproductive performance remained unaffected in either species. Reciprocal crosses were made between regenerated and unoperated beetles, and 12 progeny reared from the second clutch of each female in all treatments. Mating treatment affected eclosion time in H. convergens, whereas in C. maculata, larval development and pupation time were also affected. Considering all treatments, larval mortality was higher in H. convergens than in C. maculata, but lower when both H. convergens parents regenerated. Parental mating treatment did not affect adult weight in either species, but development of C. maculata progeny was faster when only the sire regenerated, and slower when the only the dame regenerated, whereas progeny of regenerated sires completed pupated faster than those sired by controls. We infer that genes activated during regeneration have pleiotropic effects with subtle, gender-specific, epigenetic consequences. If these pleiotropic effects are genetically linked to important traits, regenerative genetic elements could be conserved in coccinellids via natural selection acting on these traits, rather than on regenerative ability per se. aref1

^TRN: 1908398
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