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^: *https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/weed-technology/all-is sues (https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/weed-technology/all-iss ues)
^: Chaudhari S.; Jennings K.M.; Meyers S.L.
^: Response of Sweetpotato to Oryzalin Application Rate and Timing [ . ()]
^: Weed Technology, 2018; Vol.32,N 6. - P. 722-725
^: 2018
^: Bibliogr.:p.724-725
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^: The investigation of potential herbicides for weed control in sweetpotato is critical due to the limited number of registered herbicides and the development of populations of herbicide- resistant weeds. Therefore, field studies were conducted at the Horticultural Crops Research Station, Clinton, NC and the Pontotoc Ridge-Flatwoods Branch Experiment Station, Pontotoc, MS to determine the effect of oryzalin application rate and timing on sweetpotato tolerance. Oryzalin at 0.6, 1.1, 2.2, 3.4, and 4.5 kg ai ha-1 was applied immediately after transplanting or 14 d after sweetpotato transplanting (DAP). At Clinton, oryzalin applied immediately after transplanting resulted in ≤1% leaf distortion 4 and 6 wk after transplanting (WAP) regardless of application rate. However, when oryzalin was applied 14 DAP, greater sweetpotato leaf distortion was observed from 2.2, 3.4, and 4.5 kg ha-1 (≤8%) than 0.6 and 1.1 kg ha-1 (≤4%). At Pontotoc, oryzalin applied immediately after transplanting resulted in ≤6% leaf distortion 4 WAP regardless of application rate. However, when oryzalin was applied at 14 DAP, greater leaf distortion was reported from 3.4 and 4.5 kg ha-1 (11 to 13%) than 0.6, 1.1, and 2.2 kg ha-1 (4 to 6%). Oryzalin application rate and timing did not affect yield of no.1, jumbo, or marketable sweetpotato. Based on these results, oryzalin herbicide has potential for registration in sweetpotato. aref1

^TRN: 1914251
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