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^: *https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/loi/15707458 (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/loi/15707458)
^: Virla E.G.; Aguirre M.B.; Nieuwenhove G.A.van; Luft Albarracin E.B.; Logarzo G.A.
^: The relationship among host plant species, egg clutch size, and level of parasitism for the sharpshooter Tapajosa rubromarginata [ , , , Tapajosa rubromarginata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), Xylella fastidiosa, . ()]
^: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 2020; Vol.168,N 12. - P. 900-910
^: 2020
^: Bibliogr.:p.908-910
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^: The sharpshooter Tapajosa rubromarginata (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, Proconiini), a vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. (Xanthomonadaceae) that causes citrus variegated chlorosis, has more than 30 reported host plant species. The fitness of a phytophagous insect is determined by the host plant suitability, plant resistance, and the natural enemies. The aim of this study was to: (1) identify plant species utilized as oviposition substrate by T. rubromarginata in the field; (2) establish the relationship between plants and clutch size; (3) establish the relationship among host plants, clutch size, and level of parasitism; and (4) establish variations in parasitoid composition and abundance in the various host plants. Egg masses of the sharpshooter were surveyed on plants reported as hosts, or those that were abundant in the study site. The number of eggs of the sharpshooter and emerged parasitoids were recorded for all the collected masses. We found egg masses of T. rubromarginata on 12 out of 21 plant species sampled. The size of the egg masses was greatly influenced by the type of leaf venation and to a lesser extent by the plant species. Parasitism rates were influenced by both leaf venation and host plant. Trichogrammatidae species were mostly associated with egg masses in plants with parallel-veined leaves, whereas Mymaridae attacked masses laid in reticular-veined leaves. The choice between a good host plant, but heavily attacked by parasitoids, and the host plants that are less suitable for nymphs but less frequently attacked by natural enemies, was a trade-off for T. rubromarginata females to increase their fitness. We conclude that the host plant utilization by T. rubromarginata females in the field could be influenced by leaf structure and the strategy to avoid parasitism by selecting plants that were less attractive for parasitoids. aref1

^TRN: 1918974
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